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Embroidery Machines
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Mariane
Posted 2011-01-22 1:19 PM (#72132)
Subject: Embroidery Machines


I am starting a search for an embroidery machine. I have never had one and I feel the time has come to invest in one. Most of the sewing classes at my local sewing shops seem to be 75% embroidery classes. I'm looking for a basic-lower mid level machine. There are so many brands/models on the market that I'm quite at a loss to even begin searching. Please help. What features should I not do without? What are the important features versus nice to have? What brands/models do you recommend? I am not adverse to a combination sewing/embroidery machine.

Thanks in advance for any assistance.
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Karen - Tech Support
Posted 2011-01-22 1:25 PM (#72133 - in reply to #72132)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines



Tech Support

500050001000100
Location: Colorado Springs, CO

I have a Brother 700 II - there are newer versions of this machine.

Embroidery only - connects to my computer and I can send design to it.

5 x 7 hoop.

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Susan in Miami
Posted 2011-01-22 3:10 PM (#72134 - in reply to #72132)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines



Expert

Posts: 1895
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Location: Miami, Florida

Mariane,

My advice is to first get a machine from a dealer that you like and that supports the product (no matter what the brand). In my area the Bernina dealer happens to be wonderful and there are all sorts of free classes to support the machines that I have purchased. In addition, for a reasonable fee, my dealers husband works on my machines for - cleaning and repairing them. If it isn't an annual cleaning, and the issue is a small one (easy to fix) he frequently doesn't charge me at all. His work is top-notch.

So, there are so many good machines now, look for a good dealer - harder to find.

Susan

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magenta
Posted 2011-01-22 4:06 PM (#72135 - in reply to #72132)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines



Extreme Veteran

Posts: 386
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Location: Canberra, Australia
My advise would be to get the most advanced one you can afford with lots of options for re-sizing, repeating patterns etc and preferably one that connects to your computer. I have a combination sewing and embroidery machine. I love the sewing part, but the embroidery options are pretty limited so I 'out-grew' this part of the machine pretty quickly.

HTH Sarah
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Tall Karen
Posted 2011-01-22 4:24 PM (#72136 - in reply to #72132)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines



Extreme Veteran

Posts: 559
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Location: Portland, OR
I would say to NOT go top of the line. Computers and yes, sewing machines, outdate fairly quickly unless it is a basic mechanical device. The programs and the delivery method of the software even change. I would get something basic such as a Brother instead of top of the line like Bernina. Just my $.02.
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mariewilms
Posted 2011-01-22 10:27 PM (#72138 - in reply to #72132)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines


Veteran

Posts: 195
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Location: Pontiac, MI
I own a Brother 700D and a NV900, both are great machines but the NV900 is a combination sewing/embroidery. Honestly, I use my 700D more because it does a 5X7 and my NV900 only a 4X4 its rarely turned on. I suggest going to a Brother, and Singer dealers try them out before deciding, I had the Janome 200E but hated it and traded it up to the NV900. Also, check out HSN thats where I bought my 700D. Good Luck.

Edited by mariewilms 2011-01-22 10:28 PM
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anneke
Posted 2011-01-23 5:10 AM (#72141 - in reply to #72138)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines



100
Location: the netherlands

I have a pfaff2144 and the pfaffcreative 4.0 and am really happy with it

but just like they said the dealer is the most important part of it it the support

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sewsally
Posted 2011-01-23 10:25 AM (#72146 - in reply to #72132)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines



Elite Veteran

Posts: 1057
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Location: North of Seattle, WA
I have a Brother 8500 sewing-embroidery machine with 5x7 hoop.
The machine is many years old but it still great. It makes beautiful buttonholes too.

As for embroidery -- it does a great job but I find I don't do embroidery very much.

The software I have is PE Design 3.0. Its old but adequate for me since I know how to use it.

I can use purchased designs or modify, design and edit on the computer then transfer my via a reader/writer box to a Flash card that fits into my embroidery machine.

Be sure to check out the software that comes with the machine --- if any.
Check out how the designs are transfered to your embroidery machine. What seems easiest for you is the right choice.

TOL embroidery machine can cost $10K or more but there are other ones that are considerably less than that.

Also look at the hoop size the machine will handle and if that meets your needs.

After all these years I still love this Brother Sewing/Embroidery machine so I recommend you look at Brothers.

Go for a good dealer in your area too.

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NancyM
Posted 2011-01-23 11:12 AM (#72148 - in reply to #72132)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines


Extreme Veteran

Posts: 589
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If you are planning on combining the embroidery with the garment sewing, I think you should look for a machine and software that make it easy to split large designs up into smaller segments and align them accurately. Except for monograms, and unless you do a lot of children's clothing, most of the "natural" looking applications for embroidery on garments require a pretty large area--say, up the front opening of a blouse or jacket, or across the yoke of a shirt-jacket, or from knee to hem along pants side seam, or all over (e.g., sashiko) on sections like some blocks of a color-blocked tunic. You need dramatic size, though not necessarily dramatic contrast (monochrome in same color as garment looks classy). And commercial designs are almost all too densely stitched for this kind of application, so you need to plan on designing your own light-density patterns, or adapting commercial designs substantially. Thus you need good software, as well as a machine that will align the results well.

I overinvested and have been regretting it ever since. I think you're wise to go for a more basic machine!

Nancy
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Grandma C
Posted 2011-01-23 6:27 PM (#72153 - in reply to #72132)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines


Elite Veteran

Posts: 970
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Location: Alabama
I bought my first nice sewing machine second hand for $200. It is a Janome MC 5700 embroidery machine with a 4x5 hoop. It sews really well and it was enough to let me know I love machine embroidery and when I am financially able I will up grade to a newer Janome embroidery machine with the biggest hoop they have. I work with two women that have the Janome 300e embroidery only machines. They really like them and get lots of use out of them. Both women not only use them for items for themselves and families but sell their embroidery services in the hospital we work at.
At a sewing class i took last year one of the attendees brought some of the embroidery work she has been doing. It was an antique sort of lace she had made using her Phaff. The lace was to go on her daughters wedding dress. That lace was "to die for".
Hope you have good fortune searching for you machine.
PS The Bernina store here had their best display model marked down $1500 today. It is still over $9000.
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ChristineBrown
Posted 2011-01-24 4:06 PM (#72164 - in reply to #72132)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines


I have had Husqvarna since embroidery machines hit the home market. I would totally agree with buying the dealer rather than the brand, which is what I did. There is no substitute for good support--look how we love WG because of that aspect. Secondly, if you find a good dealer that stands behind product, why not consider one of their used but warranteed machines. You will get much more for your money than buying new and many of these machines are from people who upgrade for no particular reason (ask me how I know) and their machines are in great shape.
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Mariane
Posted 2011-01-24 4:15 PM (#72165 - in reply to #72132)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines


Thank you all for your comments. The consesus seems to be that the best thing is a good dealer. I will keep that in mind and look first at what my local dealers have.

Again, thanks for all the answers.

Mariane
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Grandma C
Posted 2011-01-25 12:13 PM (#72171 - in reply to #72132)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines


Elite Veteran

Posts: 970
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Location: Alabama
One more thing. Every local dealer is not a good dealer with a good reputation for good service and support. Ask around. I have a local dealer that talks a good game but then their service department has supposedly repaired a problem with my machines when i fact they couldn't find the problem and didn't tell me so I could demonstrate the problem to them. I was charged for the repair anyway.
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ursulab
Posted 2011-01-25 12:50 PM (#72172 - in reply to #72171)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines


100100
Every dealer is very nice before you buy your expensive  machine.. There is no way to know how nice he/she will be after.. 
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Melanie
Posted 2011-02-18 11:33 AM (#72592 - in reply to #72132)
Subject: RE: Embroidery Machines



252525
And my ...embroidery machine and all that goes with it...prepare to spend money. Not just on the machine, but everything that goes with it. It's all expensive. And, maintenance on computerized machines is big money. yearly servicing can be $200 and up. Don't buy a cheap one...and by that I mean a lower end model of ANY brand. If you have money..get the best. Brother makes machines at the low end..and the highest. Brother, Bernina, and Husqvarna all make expensive, beautiful machines. Brother's latest, the Quattro, has a camera in it. At first, I thought, oh, brother...but after checking it out, I can see where it would be a definite plus. if you get a machine that only goes to a 5 by 7 hoop...and you are liking embroidering..I can guarantee you will want to upgrade, right away.

Money, money, money.
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