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To interface or not to interface, that is the question...
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Julie in OH
Posted 2010-07-12 11:59 AM (#63153)
Subject: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...


Veteran

Posts: 158
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Location: Cincinnati, OH
Friends,

I admit, I have been attracted by the siren song of Peggy Sagers saying that interfacing clothing is not necessary (with a few exceptions). In fact, I made my most recent top for my SWAP -- a sleeveless v-neck made from a cotton jaquard weave tablecloth that had outlived its useful dinnertime life. Since this fabric had been washed and bleached to death in hot water dozens of times and was a bit more substantial than plain cotton, I decided to try the no interfacing approach and felt quite liberated. Now, the next shirts I plan to sew are for my FIL -- cotton batik -- not as substantial as the jaquard. I have turned shirts inside out of various makes, brands, stores, and the only thing with men's shirts that seems consistent is that there is interfacing for the collar, but not necessarily for the front facing. I'm making Simplicity 5581 from about 5 years ago (couldn't find a date) -- a button down shirt with a front facing and most importantly -- 2 pockets. So, to interface, or not to interface, that is the question...

Comments, suggestions and experiences with and without welcome!!

Thanks!!

Julie
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barbara
Posted 2010-07-12 1:44 PM (#63154 - in reply to #63153)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...


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I think I would try without the interfacing or use a very light one or use a self fabric interfacing.
I just made a shirt for dd and I interfacing the collar and the front facing. I actually used some interfacing that I got from Peggy Sagers. It was light and it looks good now, although it hasn't been washed yet, the shirt I mean.

AI think I could have skipped the interfacing in the facing, sometimes I think shirts look too stiff.
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sewsally
Posted 2010-07-13 11:58 AM (#63165 - in reply to #63153)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...



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Location: North of Seattle, WA
I really don't like iron on interfacing so I usually use self fabric, plain cotton, or silk organza.

Where: Collars or where there are going to be buttons or button holes for strength. I don't like the interfaced areas to be stiff either -- no starched collars.

On men's shirts - the tab front with the button holes is interfaced with self fabric so there are 3 layers.
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Julie in OH
Posted 2010-07-14 8:15 AM (#63177 - in reply to #63153)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...


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Posts: 158
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Location: Cincinnati, OH
Thanks for the suggestions. Went looking for a light cotton interfacing yesterday and came up empty handed. Have a couple of short projects to work on between now and the shirts, so I'll continue thinking about my options.

Continued suggestions/experiences welcome!!

Julie
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Olwynmary
Posted 2010-07-14 9:34 AM (#63179 - in reply to #63153)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...


Ahem! for "light cotton interfacing" think plain white sheeting or shirting. In fact, in an emergency during a snowstorm when I lived in Northern Ohio and didn't want to go out, I once used the good edges of an old, well-washed cotton sheet which was worn out in the middle but perfectly sturdy at the edges and the bottom hem.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.
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mastdenman
Posted 2010-07-14 3:27 PM (#63186 - in reply to #63153)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...


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Location: Southern California
Self facing is the best. No bubbling, shrinking or similar problems.
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Julie in OH
Posted 2010-07-14 6:03 PM (#63190 - in reply to #63179)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...


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Posts: 158
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Location: Cincinnati, OH
Olwynmary,

I have considered using plain old muslin, but I'm finding that what I can easily find at Hancock's or TSWLTH shrinks horribly -- no matter how badly I abuse it for shrinkage before hand. Have resorted to getting 200 TC muslin and in more of a twill type weave if I can find it and then abusing it several times with very hot water and hard drying and that seems to help but isn't a guarantee. Used a well shrunk (I thought) 200 TC regular weave for a color blocked cotton top I did last year. Turned out really cute, but it is shrinking on the lengthwise grain, so my well thought out seamlines aren't where I planned them to be anymore. Will have to restock on my muslin anyway -- I took what I had and cut it into 1/2 yard lengths and put it into the dye bags from a fabric dying class I took a few weeks ago. The originals dyed fabrics were very bright and the "extras" were a lovely pastel -- waste not, want not. But I digress...

Have considered using a poly-cotton blend broadcloth, but I really want these shirts to be able to breathe particularly because the interfaced pieces will be around the neck. I don't mind using fusibles and have seen fusible cotton broadcloth available, but not yesterday.....

BTW, where in Northern Ohio? I grew up in a tiny town outside of Lima.

Comments and experiences welcome.

Julie
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Olwynmary
Posted 2010-07-14 9:07 PM (#63192 - in reply to #63153)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...


In that case your best bet is to follow Marilyn and use self fabric - either leftovers after you cut, or perhaps buy an extra half-yard in the beginning.

We started out in Lorain, which is where my dh's job was. Quite a shock, coming direct from Montreal. Moved to a couple of other places and ended up in Oberlin. Which tiny town were you in? I used to drive all over the northern half of the state when I was on the diocesan board of Episcopal Church Women

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans
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PCMomwad
Posted 2010-07-14 10:43 PM (#63195 - in reply to #63153)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...



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I want to vote for using interfacings to provide support and preserve shaping, but only good quality interfacings.  I purchase mine from the independents like Pam Erny's excellent line http://sewexciting.blogspot.com/ or http://www.thesewingplace.com/ or at sewing shows.  I like tricot knit, weft insertion, and silk organza the best, though I do have others and sometimes use self fabric.

I interface collars and button bands, cuffs and necklines on woven tops and some knits.  When making tailored jackets, I interface the shoulder areas as well the center front, back shoulders, and sleeve and bottom hems.  I use interfacing or stiff elastic in my pants waistbands.  Most of my clothes look good for decades.   You can see the last 8 years of most of my sewing (PMB!) at www.flyingember.com/sewing/sewing.html

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Julie in OH
Posted 2010-07-14 11:45 PM (#63196 - in reply to #63195)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...


Veteran

Posts: 158
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Location: Cincinnati, OH
I too like using interfacing for support and after all, using it has been drilled into us by just about every publication and expert out there except Ms. Sagers. Good quality interfacings -- almost an oxymoron if Hancock's and TSWLTH are options. I have had wildly different results from basic fusible pellon tricot (my interfacing of choice) even with rinsing in hot water, letting cool and hanging to dry. Can't control for age, how it was stored, processing variations, etc. Can have flawless results or.... bubbling may or may not occur, fusing glue may or may not be consistent, post fusing release may or may not happen.... Since there are only a few manufacturers I have a hard time with the notion that an independent seller will have something "superior"-- haven't tried the independent sellers wares so I have no real comparison. I can't really tell a difference -- what is available at the shows feels the same as what is in the stores. Feel free to convince me otherwise.

I may try the self facing on one shirt and none on the other just for comparison purposes. I still have time to ponder options.

Olwynmary, I grew up in Elida -- ever heard of it??

Opinions/experiences welcome.

Julie
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Susan in Miami
Posted 2010-07-15 6:49 AM (#63198 - in reply to #63196)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...



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Julie,

I swear by Pam Erny's interfacing, it is better. Better than any pellon product I have ever used. I am just a very satisfied customer, no business connection.  The weft insertion (one of my favorites) is rayon and does not have to be prewashed - there is no shrinkage.

You have to order online but you can just get a yard or two to try, I think you will be happy.

Susan

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PCMomwad
Posted 2010-07-16 12:43 AM (#63219 - in reply to #63196)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...



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Julie, Pam Erny has researched the properties of interfacing very extensively and has hers made to her specifications.  I agree you should try it. 
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pldesigns
Posted 2010-07-16 7:40 AM (#63250 - in reply to #63219)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...



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Location: Holyoke, MA

Pam also carries a very nice woven fusible that is great for shirt collars.  Crisp without looking like a board.  ( again, no affiliation, just love her products)

Sue

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Karen Maslowski
Posted 2010-07-16 11:28 AM (#63273 - in reply to #63250)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...


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Location: Cincinnati, OH
And since Pam is a professional shirtmaker, she ought to know what works best.

Julie and OlwynMary, my daughter lives in Perrysburg.
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barbara
Posted 2010-07-16 2:00 PM (#63286 - in reply to #63273)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...


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Interfacings drive me crazy. the fabric stores don't carry anything useable. I don't don't know who uses the stuff and for what. there just can't be that many manufacturers of interfacing, I wouldn't think.

where do they manufacture it? I see different ones all the time, and never the same one that I used before.

I would think a shirt maker would know the best kind to use.

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Julie in OH
Posted 2010-07-17 11:20 AM (#63325 - in reply to #63286)
Subject: RE: To interface or not to interface, that is the question...


Veteran

Posts: 158
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Location: Cincinnati, OH
OK, OK!! With ringing endorsements like that I will have to check it out. Not afraid to pay a bit more for quality (although I will miss the thrill of the 40% off coupon -- yeah, I like a bargain).

Today's project -- stitch a crinkled cotton skirt to my knit top for an instant new summer dress. Then, confirm that I have enough denim and muslin in the stash to make a couple of coupon holders that I've promised to folks. Then.... shirts for FIL.

As always, thanks for your suggestions. You guys are great!!

Julie
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