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How to transfer markings to fabric?
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EasilyAmewsed
Posted 2008-01-16 9:04 PM (#38281)
Subject: How to transfer markings to fabric?


Extreme Veteran

Posts: 528
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Location: Eugene OR
I thought I would test your tolerences once again to ask...what methods to you use to transfer your darts, pleats, etc. ?
I've never used transfer paper myself...since all my patterns WERE on tracing paper I'd marked by snips in SAs & folding pieces back in increments and used a disappearing ink pen or chaulk pencil.
I don't think that will work as nicely with my PMB patterns and I don't want to fold them. Do you guys cut out darts and pleats entirely and trace or make holes along marking lines so you can sink a pencil / pen & then play connect the dots?
Shelley
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rosemary
Posted 2008-01-17 12:57 AM (#38286 - in reply to #38281)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?



Certified Educator

Posts: 509
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Location: Houston, TX
I don't know what anyone else does but I don't seem to be able to get away from tailor's tacks which I learned in high school a very long time ago.

I don't like the tracing wheel deal - not accurate enough for me.
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Geneave
Posted 2008-01-17 1:47 AM (#38287 - in reply to #38286)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


I never did learn how to do the taylor tacks. They looked too involved for me and seemed like they would take up a lot of time. I
stick pins in the little black circles for the darts and mark them with ink, fabric crayon, etc. anything that I can see well enough. Sometimes I connect the dots by drawing a line with a ruler but most of the time with cotton fabric I just fold the darts, start at the
wide end and sew them. I haven't seemed to have any problem with them showing after my garments are washed. I realize I would
have to use something else sometimes if I was making something that was more formal and such. I want to try tailors chaulk but
have never seen any one using it and am not exacttly sure how it is used.

Geneave

Edited by Geneave 2008-01-17 1:48 AM
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Cynky
Posted 2008-01-17 5:41 AM (#38289 - in reply to #38281)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


10010025
I use a leather punch and the self healing mat to punch holes in the PMB pattern to mark the darts and other points I wish to mark. Then I push pins through the holes in the pattern into the fabric. I make sure the hole I punch in the pattern is just big enough for the pin head to go through.

Cynthia
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Karen Maslowski
Posted 2008-01-17 7:56 AM (#38291 - in reply to #38281)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


Member

Posts: 2468
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Location: Cincinnati, OH
I still use the good old tracing paper that I learned to use in high school. I guess we all do that--stick with what works best for us.

It's more difficult with thicker paper, but I've never had a problem yet. I do use snips at the dart legs at the cutting line, and I use snips for various matching points, as indicated on the pattern--front and back armscye, shoulder points, center front and center back, pleat marks, and the matching points for princess seams. That seems to work fine.

I have done tailor's tacks, but only if the fabric is thick. They actually take less time than dragging out the tracing paper and tracer, once the needle is threaded.
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Karen Maslowski
Posted 2008-01-17 7:59 AM (#38292 - in reply to #38281)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


Member

Posts: 2468
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Location: Cincinnati, OH
Just wanted to add that I NEVER use pen to mark, especially not ballpoint pen. It can go wrong so easily, as I have lived to regret finding out, particularly on garments. And since I often mark, then walk away from a project for any amount of time, I prefer not to use vanishing pens, either. They seem to vanish at inopportune times, at least for me!

Your mileage may vary, naturally!
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Karen - Tech Support
Posted 2008-01-17 8:20 AM (#38293 - in reply to #38281)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?



Tech Support

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Location: Colorado Springs, CO

I'm with Karen on sewing marking pens.  When I was teaching I would not let the students use them.  Some don't go away or are set when the garment is pressed.

I mark edge markings such as the top darts in pants with tiny snips.  I use a pencil to indent the dart apex - fold up the pattern and mark with a pin.

I bet most of you could set a perfect dart without drawing a line.

I also use tiny snips to mark CF lines.

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Marilyn in Oviedo Fl
Posted 2008-01-17 10:04 AM (#38302 - in reply to #38281)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


Veteran

Posts: 134
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I mark my darts as Karen does, but take it one step further. I leave a long upper thread tail when I start the dart, and then take a few stitches sink my needle and raise the foot. bring the thread tail to the front and wrap it around the pin at the apex. Now I have a guide using the thread tail. Very easy and fast.

Marilyn
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Geneave
Posted 2008-01-17 1:06 PM (#38309 - in reply to #38289)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


What is a self healing mat? I don't think I have ever heard that before and how big is it? Sounds interesting! Another sewing gadget I can look for. I am for anything that will help me get finished cutting out and getting ready to sew my garment. Do you think maybe real thick cardboard might work too?
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Geneave
Posted 2008-01-17 1:22 PM (#38310 - in reply to #38291)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?




I still use the good old tracing paper that I learned to use in high school. I guess we all do that--stick with what works best for us.

I like the lines to work with but am so slow in getting them marked this way and I never seem to be able to find a color that works for me like I want it to. If you have a stiff and numb hand working with the little prickly wheel is hard to do. And I have several of those little wheels I have picked up at yard sales etc. It is surprising how they have changed over the years.

It's more difficult with thicker paper, but I've never had a problem yet. I do use snips at the dart legs at the cutting line, and I use snips for various matching points, as indicated on the pattern--front and back armscye, shoulder points, center front and center back, pleat marks, and the matching points for princess seams. That seems to work fine.

I use snips too especially on sleeves to mark the front and back and shoulder seams.

I have done tailor's tacks, but only if the fabric is thick. They actually take less time than dragging out the tracing paper and tracer, once the needle is threaded.

Can you please describe how to do the tailor tacks? I guess you would pull the thread through the paper pattern and fabric and then snip off? Am I right? Do you then pull the threads out as you sew? I don't know why but I have never figured out how to do this. I love this forum. I learn so much when reading in it.
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Geneave
Posted 2008-01-17 1:27 PM (#38311 - in reply to #38281)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


I need to learn better how to use the quote. All my sentences get lost in with the other persons because I am doing something wrong.
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rowena___.
Posted 2008-01-17 1:27 PM (#38312 - in reply to #38281)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?



20001000500100100100
Location: music city, USA
marking depends on what is being marked--a dart, a pocket, a notch, etc--and what is being marked on--chiffon, flannel, etc.

if possible, i mark darts and applied pieces with awl punches, but usually i just cut the darts out and draw them on the fabric with a #2 pencil.

i cut out notches and mark them with pencil, or sometimes with wax/soap/chalk. rarely i will mark with a snip--since i finish many edges before sewing, snipping is not my first choice.

i don't mark much, i do a lot of it by eye.

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Karen Maslowski
Posted 2008-01-17 1:59 PM (#38313 - in reply to #38310)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


Member

Posts: 2468
20001001001001002525
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Here's a site that has several marking options, including tailor's tacks, with a description of how to make them:

http://sewing.about.com/library/sewnews/library/aamarking0404a.htm

I don't use tracing paper on every fabric; it's not possible on some, especially very thick fabric, or multicolor prints. Tailor's tacks are perfect for those types of fabrics.
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Karen Maslowski
Posted 2008-01-17 2:03 PM (#38314 - in reply to #38309)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


Member

Posts: 2468
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Location: Cincinnati, OH
Have you ever used a rotary cutter, Geneave? That's the kind of cutting implement you need a cutting mat for, and a self-healing mat is one that does not scar as badly as the non-healing kind, when used over and over again with a rotary cutter. Quilters, especially, like the self-healing mats, since they often use the same spot to cut many dozens (or even hundreds) of pieces the same size.

Just do a Google search for "self-healing cutting mat", or just "rotary cutting mat", and you will find a lot of sources.

If you have hand strength issues, rotary cutters might help.
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Geneave
Posted 2008-01-17 2:36 PM (#38317 - in reply to #38314)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


Karen Maslowski - 2008-01-17 12:03 PM

Have you ever used a rotary cutter, Geneave? That's the kind of cutting implement you need a cutting mat for, and a self-healing mat is one that does not scar as badly as the non-healing kind, when used over and over again with a rotary cutter. Quilters, especially, like the self-healing mats, since they often use the same spot to cut many dozens (or even hundreds) of pieces the same size.

Just do a Google search for "self-healing cutting mat", or just "rotary cutting mat", and you will find a lot of sources.

If you have hand strength issues, rotary cutters might help.


Yes I do have a rotary cutter but it needs sharpening now. I don't care for them much. I can't control the cutting well enough. I will get my mat out and see how that method of poking holes works.

One thing I have been meaning to mention about cutting out garments though is that I usually start on the left side of the pattern and I guess you would say it is cutting backwards. It seems to work better for me because the scissors blade is always next to the pattern and makes a neater edge.

Thank you Karen.
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Geneave
Posted 2008-01-17 2:37 PM (#38318 - in reply to #38313)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


Karen Maslowski - 2008-01-17 11:59 AM

Here's a site that has several marking options, including tailor's tacks, with a description of how to make them:

http://sewing.about.com/library/sewnews/library/aamarking0404a.htm

I don't use tracing paper on every fabric; it's not possible on some, especially very thick fabric, or multicolor prints. Tailor's tacks are perfect for those types of fabrics.


Thanks for the website. I will check it out.
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Geneave
Posted 2008-01-17 2:43 PM (#38320 - in reply to #38312)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


rowena___. - 2008-01-17 11:27 AM

marking depends on what is being marked--a dart, a pocket, a notch, etc--and what is being marked on--chiffon, flannel, etc.

if possible, i mark darts and applied pieces with awl punches, but usually i just cut the darts out and draw them on the fabric with a #2 pencil.

i cut out notches and mark them with pencil, or sometimes with wax/soap/chalk. rarely i will mark with a snip--since i finish many edges before sewing, snipping is not my first choice.

i don't mark much, i do a lot of it by eye.

Hey thanks. What kind of wax. ? Are you talking about the little pencils. I bought three colors the other night and am using them some.
Have never tried soap but maybe will try that today. Sometimes I too finish a seam first and then I lose the snip.

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cfonfold
Posted 2008-01-17 2:48 PM (#38321 - in reply to #38311)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?



Expert

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Location: Norman,OK

Geneave - 2008-01-17 1:27 PM I need to learn better how to use the quote. All my sentences get lost in with the other persons because I am doing something wrong.

Geneave I don't know if this the right way or not--but on a whim I clicked reply, highlighted part of your note and then clicked quote. And it worked!

Coopie

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Geneave
Posted 2008-01-17 4:06 PM (#38323 - in reply to #38321)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


cfonfold - 2008-01-17 12:48 PM

Geneave - 2008-01-17 1:27 PM I need to learn better how to use the quote. All my sentences get lost in with the other persons because I am doing something wrong.

Geneave I don't know if this the right way or not--but on a whim I clicked reply, highlighted part of your note and then clicked quote. And it worked!

Coopie



Thanks. Checking your method out.
Geneave
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rowena___.
Posted 2008-01-17 4:42 PM (#38324 - in reply to #38320)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?



20001000500100100100
Location: music city, USA
Geneave - 2008-01-17 12:43 PM
Hey thanks. What kind of wax. ? Are you talking about the little pencils. I bought three colors the other night and am using them some.


tailor crayons, they disappear when you iron them, they are really great on things like wool. i buy them by the box.
http://www.southstarsupply.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=21&pr...


Have never tried soap but maybe will try that today.


soap slivers are what we used in the philippines, and to this day i am very sentimental about my slivers. :D

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Geneave
Posted 2008-01-17 5:28 PM (#38325 - in reply to #38324)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


tailor crayons, they disappear when you iron them, they are really great on things like wool. i buy them by the box.
http://www.southstarsupply.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=21&pr...

Another "most wanted" item on my want list.

soap slivers are what we used in the philippines, and to this day i am very sentimental about my slivers. :D

When I make my other pair of black slacks I will try the soap. Maybe it will show up better than what I have been doing and be easier too.
P.S. I sure have learned a lot today!

Thanks!

Edited by Geneave 2008-01-17 5:29 PM
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cfonfold
Posted 2008-01-17 6:33 PM (#38327 - in reply to #38324)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?



Expert

Posts: 1974
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Location: Norman,OK

But be very careful using tailor's wax on blends with polyester. It will leave an oily stain that is difficult to remove. Regular powdered chalk might be best.

Coopie

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Geneave
Posted 2008-01-17 6:43 PM (#38328 - in reply to #38327)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


Thanks for that information. I won't have to worry about knowingly using wax on polyester because I am allergic to it. What is so disappointing though is to go shopping, find fabric that is supposed to be all cotten and after getting it home, washing it, drying it, ironing it and then getting it cut out and halfway sewn you discover tbat it has polyester in it too because of the way you react to it plus you finally smell that polyester smell. Is there anyway you can tell us about how to find out exactly what is in a piece of fabric?

Sorry... I guess I am getting off the subject line but can't figure out how to separate the two subjects at this point.
Geneave

Edited by Geneave 2008-01-17 6:48 PM
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Beverly A.
Posted 2008-01-17 9:25 PM (#38339 - in reply to #38328)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?


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Location: Near Houston TX
Geneave - 2008-01-17 5:43 PM

Is there anyway you can tell us about how to find out exactly what is in a piece of fabric?

First of all is a bit of education on fabrics themselves. That is why many of us want to feel the fabric we are contemplating buying. Can you trust the label on the bolt of fabric? That depends on the store. In Houston, a well known large fabric store buys from jobbers and rebolts the fabric on pre-used bolts that sometimes still have the label from the previous fabric.
Some will try the flame test. It is not 100% accurate but might send you in the right direction. Polyester is usually evident using the flame test.
The ones I really dislike and avoid are the labels that say "undetermined fiber content".
It is a matter of time, experience and education coupled with finding sources you can trust as to the fiber content.
Beverly A.

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Geneave
Posted 2008-01-17 10:17 PM (#38345 - in reply to #38339)
Subject: RE: How to transfer markings to fabric?




Is there anyway you can tell us about how to find out exactly what is in a piece of fabric?

First of all is a bit of education on fabrics themselves. That is why many of us want to feel the fabric we are contemplating buying. Can you trust the label on the bolt of fabric? That depends on the store. In Houston, a well known large fabric store buys from jobbers and rebolts the fabric on pre-used bolts that sometimes still have the label from the previous fabric.
Some will try the flame test. It is not 100% accurate but might send you in the right direction. Polyester is usually evident using the flame test.
The ones I really dislike and avoid are the labels that say "undetermined fiber content".
It is a matter of time, experience and education coupled with finding sources you can trust as to the fiber content.
Beverly A.

Thanks Beverly. Maybe what is happening a lot of times for me is the material has been transfered to another holder. I just about always avoid the "undertimed fiber content" too. Sometimes I know because I have been watching that particular piece of material and it goes on sale.
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